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Club Level Feature – International Products Corporation – Specialty Chemical Manufacturer Since 1923

International Products Corporation (IPC) produces and markets specialty chemical products with emphasis on precision cleaners and assembly lubricants. IPC serves an international market with customers in the commercial, industrial, government and academic sectors. It reaches these markets through a combination of distributors, direct-sales and internet marketing. Currently, new products aimed at the consumer market are being developed. IPC also serves as a supplier of private-label products.

Founded in 1923, the company has been owned by Charles E. Granito since 1981. Rapid growth from 1981 to 1989 enabled the firm to move from Trenton, NJ, to a new custom-designed facility in Burlington, NJ, in 1990. On a four-acre site, this 20,000 ft2 building incorporates marketing, research, processing, packaging and warehousing functions that are key to IPC’s operations. Extraordinary steps were taken to make this facility safe for employees and the environment, and to assure that products made there meet the highest standards of quality. The on-site laboratory is equipped to expand quality and analytical work, allow for research on new and improved products and assist customers with technical testing.

In 1984, IPC opened IPCW, Inc., a subsidiary in the UK. IPCW distributes product for IPC throughout the European market. IPC also has distributors in China, India, Korea, Japan and Taiwan.

The full-line of precision cleaning products includes its flagship concentrated cleaner, Micro-90®. The line includes biodegradable, alkaline, acidic, neutral and enzyme cleaning products for a broad range of industries and applications. These include cleaning of labware, filter membranes, medical devices, pharmaceutical equipment and precision parts. All are registered with NSF as A1 cleaners.

P-80® Temporary Rubber Lubricants are unique formulated products for assembly of rubber and soft plastic parts (belts, bushings, grips, grommets, hoses, o-rings, seals) for the automotive, agricultural, appliance, aerospace, marine, pump and tool industries to name a few.

IPC is committed to making products that are water-based and to replace solvent and petroleum-based cleaners and lubricants. IPC avoids use of known carcinogens and hazardous chemicals, only using materials found on TSCA and EINESCS inventories. IPC maintains a ZERO discharge policy including wastewater, emissions and hazardous waste. And no product is considered highly toxic or corrosive. It is policy to keep abreast of environmental regulations such as removal of flame-retardants and certain metals (cadmium, mercury, chromium and lead) in products. IPC is an ISO-Certified Company.

IPC is an essential business.  Company operations have been continuous throughout the COVID-19 pandemic. Disinfecting surfaces to kill traces of microbes and disease is a critical concern right now. A common misconception is that simply disinfecting a surface is enough to sanitize it. This is not the case, cleaning and disinfecting are both important parts of a thorough sanitizing process. IPC’s products clean parts and surfaces first, allowing for proper sterilization after.

What is Cleaning? Cleaning refers to removing all dirt and soils from a surface. Detergents are used to clean surfaces. “Cleaning is the complete removal of…soil using appropriate detergent chemicals under recommended conditions.”

What is Disinfecting? Disinfecting refers to destroying or killing any germs, microbes or bacteria that are present on the surface. Disinfectants are used to accomplish this task.  “A disinfectant is a product which kills microbes without employing a soil removal action.”

Why do both? Surfaces must be properly cleaned prior to disinfecting. Removing traces of dirt, debris, and dust primes surfaces and equipment for disinfection. Soils can harbor germs and bacteria. Disinfection becomes less effective if surface soils are present.

What happens if I disinfect without cleaning? If a surface is disinfected before it is cleaned, the remaining soils can still contribute to the growth of harmful microbes and lead to further contamination. The residual soils may also serve as a barrier, preventing the disinfectant from reaching the surface and doing its job. Lingering soils on the surface may affect the active chemicals in a disinfectant, impacting their efficiency. If the surface is thoroughly cleaned first, and validated for cleanliness, the disinfection step becomes much more effective.

What are the steps for proper cleaning and disinfecting?

  1. Remove large debris
  2. Surface rinse with potable water
  3. Clean with a specialty detergent like Micro-90® or Micro® Green Clean
  4. Rinse thoroughly with potable water
  5. Disinfect
  6. Rinse again
  7. For regulated industries, validate the cleaning process

Contact IPC’s product specialists for more information about hard surface cleaners for manufacturing and laboratory applications.

Free product samples are available for testing. Request a sample for testing.

201 Connecticut Drive
Burlington, NJ 08016, USA
IPCW, Inc.
238 Green Lane
Green Lane Business Park
London SE9 3TL UK
www.ipcol.com

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